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Conference

Politics of Counterterrorism, Immigration, and Asylum: The shifting contours of rights in a new World Order
Dr. Adebowale Williams Akande

IRC- NGO Research Cluster, Lagos-Lesotho/Southern Africa.

Focus Summary

Since September 11 2001, and in the wake of terrorist attacks in Nigeria, Turkey, San Bernardino, Calif, Paris and Brussels, terrorism has become much of a priority for governments around the world. This leads to intense fear of foreigners and demand for stricter control of cross-border movement of people, cumulating in European restrictionalism that left out asylum seekers from mainstream society.

This paper examines the impacts of this social exclusion on new migrants or asylum seekers and refugees (ASRs) armed with both qualifications and skills that are beset with high levels of unemployment or underemployment with no decent wages, in Europe. This state of affair of social exclusion may serve to further oppress and traumatize the ASRs and hinder them from making meaningful contributions to their newfound countries.

The paper concludes by suggesting society-based prevention programs that aim at reducing ASR mass-trauma, mental health, joblessness, mass people displacement, poverty, and other vulnerabilities, as a result of mass influx from middle east and north Africa.

Implications for policymakers, governments and human rights activists to learn from the precept that ‘employment is central to integration’ as ‘against accepting prima facie that terrorism is central to the securitisation of migration’ are briefly discussed.

Key Insights
  • The human costs of war on terrorism are continually felt in almost every corner of the globe.
  • Terrorism is a harbinger of undesirable events undermining human rights, and robbing of individuals’ entitlement to the full enjoyment of the right to life, liberty and physical integrity of victims. Alongside, toppling Governments, displacing civil society, wiping out peace and security, and presenting a danger to socio-economic projections.
  • The impacts of this social exclusion on new migrants or asylum seekers and refugees (ASRs) armed with both qualifications and skills that are beset with high levels of unemployment or underemployment with no decent wages, in Europe and around the World.
  • The various world powers and leaders should learn from the precept that ‘employment is central to integration’ as ‘against accepting prima facie that terrorism is central to the securitisation of migration’.
Key take-outs from the ISHHR 2017 Conference (industry feedback, networking, peer presentations):

The politics played by the 29 member Global Counterterrorism Forum led by America. Saudi Arabia and Qatar on one hand and Russia and the United States etc.

Future goals — what’s next?

To develop this presentation into a full publication in due course.

How can local / national / international media better assist in bringing the vital issues discussed at ISHHR 2017 to light, and further encourage real, positive change and understanding?

To avoid fake news and speak to power. That ‘employment is central to integration’ as ‘against accepting prima facie that terrorism is central to the securitisation of migration’.

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